Interior Design

Erin Boyle - Episode 006

Erin Boyle from Reading My Tea Leaves on Small Space Living | The Honest Home Podcast

While living in a small space can seem like a recipe for frustration for some, for others it can feel like a slice of freedom. Erin Boyle of Reading My Tea Leaves joyfully lives in a tiny one bedroom apartment with her husband and small daughter in Brooklyn NY. She shared a bit about their life in a 400 square foot apartment, what is important, living simply, considerations for their relationships in relation to their space and more. I so enjoyed talking with Erin and I hope that you enjoy the conversation! 

 

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Erin Boyle of Reading My Tea Leaves | The Honest Home Podcast
Erin Boyle of Reading My Tea Leaves | The Honest Home Podcast
Erin Boyle of Reading My Tea Leaves | The Honest Home Podcast

Feels Like Home // Nooks and Crannies

Do you have a childhood memory of finding that one spot in your house to burrow into and feel safe and secure, breaking away from the rest of your family for a short time? 

Now that homes are being built with more open floor plans, many are lacking a places for adults and children to break away while still being connected. "These are places at the edges of the rooms, or in between the rooms. The window seats, the arched writing nook in the bedroom, and the cushioned bench in the entry." - Michaela Mahady in Welcoming Home. 

Reese Witherspoon's home in Ojai via  Elle Decor

Reese Witherspoon's home in Ojai via Elle Decor

You don't need a nook built in to your home to achieve this. You can carve out a small area of your home to be able to "crawl" into and look out from. 

Betsy Burnham via  Lonny

Betsy Burnham via Lonny

Just like children, adults need a place to break away and re-focus. Nooks and crannies aren't just for children. Hiding under the covers of our bed doesn't have to be the only place adults can feel secure and hidden. 

via  Michael Graydon  - Toronto, Canada

via Michael Graydon - Toronto, Canada

Mimi London via  Architectural Digest . Photo by  David O. Marlow

Mimi London via Architectural Digest. Photo by David O. Marlow

Do you remember the feeling of safety as a child while escaping to a special nook? Do you have one as an adult? 

Minimalism Misunderstood

White walls, white rigid furniture, no accessories...minimalism right? That doesn’t sound appealing or inviting. 

Many think feel that minimalism is all about restrictions, but it is actually about freedom. 

Freedom from our stuff. 

Sarah Lonsdale's home. Photo by Matthew Williams. via  Remodelista

Sarah Lonsdale's home. Photo by Matthew Williams. via Remodelista

“Minimalism is a tool used to rid yourself of life’s excess in favor of focusing on what’s important so you can find happiness, fulfillment, and freedom.” - Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus

Happiness, fulfillment and freedom. Sign me up. Although, it will look differently for everyone. For me, it’s contentment, joy and freedom. 

How does minimalism fit in with the design of your home? Two of my favorite design blogs have posted recently about their take on minimalism. 

 

Remodelista describes the style Warm Minimalism as “design that's uncluttered yet inviting, clean-lined but tactile, and above all livable and life-enhancing”.

Sarah Lonsdale's home. Photo by Matthew Williams. via  Remodelista

Sarah Lonsdale's home. Photo by Matthew Williams. via Remodelista

Sycamore Street Press’s Eva Jorgensen has had an evolving personal aesthetic that has translated into her family’s (amazing) paper good’s business. She describes it as Minimal Bohemian. 

  Penelope Loorham’s house  for The Design Files.  Photo by  Eve Wilson , via  Sycamore Street Press

 Penelope Loorham’s house for The Design Files.  Photo by Eve Wilson, via Sycamore Street Press

Courtney Klein's home. Photo by Ann Street Studio via  Sycamore Street Press

Courtney Klein's home. Photo by Ann Street Studio via Sycamore Street Press

Michelle LeBlanc’s home on  Design*Sponge  via  Sycamore Street Press

Michelle LeBlanc’s home on Design*Sponge via Sycamore Street Press

I’ve been reading (slowly but surely) the book Clutterfree with Kids. I recommend it even if you don’t have kids. 

Are you a minimalist, a maximalist, or somewhere in between? Are you craving freedom from your excess? 

Using Ductwork to Your Advantage

Do you like the look of exposed ductwork?

Designing a space with HVAC ducts located inside a conditioned space can save you 15-20% on your electricity bills as well as reduce the size of air conditioner you need by 25%

Brooklyn Townhouse via  Casa Sugar

Brooklyn Townhouse via Casa Sugar

Benefits include: 

  • Smaller heating systems
  • Potentially lower installation cost
  • Better indoor air quality and moisture management
  • More comfortable home
  • Better indoor air quality
via  The Ranch Mine  in Phoenix Arizona

via The Ranch Mine in Phoenix Arizona

It’s easiest to achieve while planning for it in the design phase of a new home, but there may be options for existing ducts in unconditioned spaces. If you don't really love the look of exposed ductwork, there are more options. Such as situating it between floors in a two story home, or a conditioned crawl space. For more information and good strategies visit ductsinside.org